expect nothing
Jesus

209 notes

(Source: orneryjabroni, via fall1997)


35 notes flanguage:

such custom very art wow 

flanguage:

such custom very art wow 

(via kawahineaihonua)


24 notes

high-tech-low-fashion:

The Blitz Kids were a group of young people who frequented the weekly Blitz club-night in Covent Garden, London in 1979-80, and are credited with launching the New Romantic subcultural movement.

Crucially, the club lay between two art colleges (St Martin’s School and Central School) and became a testbed for student fashion designers who set London ablaze during the 1980s.”

[Wiki]

"An evening with the orbit of London’s Blitz club superstars – and we’re talking about 50 people here – was more than entertaining. You were zapped with a very tangible electric shock — what we’d call today “sensory overload” — as if these exquisite, compulsive posers had revitalised Gilbert & George’s notion from 1969 of processing through the world as living sculptures. The Blitz Kids generated their own crackling versions of hyper-reality that defined the space around them. They included Kim, Julia, Judi, Melissa, Fiona, Jayne, Theresa, Myra, Scarlett, Clare, Michele, Darla, Sade, Kate, Stevie, Naomi, Mandy, Helen, Jo, Perri and Christine … the Stephens Linard and Jones, Lee, John, Cerith, Simon, Iain, Andy, George, Marilyn, Wilf, Greg, Jeffrey, Christos, Graham, Neil, Dencil, Robert, the Holahs, the Richards Ostell and Sharah. A fair few other Blitz Kids, like Strange, Egan, Elms, Sullivan, Dagger, Haines, Ure, O’Donnell, Mole, Ball and Lewis, had the motormouth skills of energetic talkers and schemers who were, as we say today, “good in the room”. Above all, the best among them “made things happen” wherever they set foot. That’s why spending time with them was the best kind of fun – stimulating, argumentative and constructive, whether idling at a bar or bounding around the beach on Bournemouth bank holidays … ”

[Shapers of the 80’s]

"After Billy’s came The Blitz. A dodgy old Covent Garden wine bar with a Second World War theme, gas masks and photos of Winston Churchill on the walls. Legends have developed around the year or so of f Tuesday nights, when Steve presided over the door like a benign tyrant, Rusty spun his record collection and George was the coat-check girl, and rightly so. Books have been written, plays performed, films made and stories told and re-told about The Blitz because it was that important. The Blitz was a pressure cooker of creativity, which would dominate youth culture for a generation. The list of bands which can directly or indirectly be traced back to that tiny dancefloor is staggering: Spandau Ballet, Culture Club, Visage, Ultravox, Sade, Wham!, Bananarama, Blue Rondo A La Turk, Haysi Fantayzee, Animal Nightlife… But it wasn’t just music. Dance, design, fashion, photography, writing, almost no aspect of British cultural life was untouched by this rag-tag gang of students, hairdressers, shop assistants and unemployed poseurs.

As soon as the queues for The Blitz grew longer than the place could accommodate, so others followed… Soon every doorway promised a party and every alley secreted a scene. London was swinging again.

Taken from Robert Elms’s introduction to ‘We Can Be Heroes: Punks, Poseurs, Peacocks and People of a Particular Persuasion’ by Graham Smith”

oh gr8 and powerful Lord of Darkness, pls bless me with time-travel powers so i may return to my people kthanksbyeeeee


2,265 notes

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2,593 notes mazzystardust:

A-POC Demo, June 5 2000. A project developed by Issey Miyake and Dai Fujiwara

mazzystardust:

A-POC Demo, June 5 2000. A project developed by Issey Miyake and Dai Fujiwara

(via doom-girl)


29 notes

Ice Water by Cat Power
2,290 notes

louteasdale:

Vivienne Westwood SS15, make-up by Val Garland. Wet any colour eye shadow and apply to eyebrows.

(via yungsevigny)


1,948 notes

Naomi by Neutral Milk Hotel
76 notes

crystallizations:

Courtney Love photographed by Ellen von Unwerth.

(Source: forums.thefashionspot.com)


1,352 notes nickyrhodes:

Adam Ant featured in Flexipop magazine, 1981. (x)

nickyrhodes:

Adam Ant featured in Flexipop magazine, 1981. (x)

(via tokyo-fashion)


1,369 notes

bunnyfood:

(via gifsboom)


2,155 notes passportecho:

Issey Miyake skirt
ᴀʀᴄʜɪᴠᴇ ᴄʟᴜʙ

passportecho:

Issey Miyake skirt

ᴀʀᴄʜɪᴠᴇ ᴄʟᴜʙ

(Source: archive-club, via softpeach)


1,105 notes house-of-thought:

Viking Magic Wand
For decades the experts at the British Museum believed that this item, discovered at a woman’s grave from Norway was just a hook used in fishing. However, new research suggests that it was her ‘magic wand’ and that it was deliberately bent to destroy its power.The Times newspaper reported that this item, a 90 cm long iron rod, was first brought to the British Museum in 1894. British Museum curator Sue Branning believes that it was probably a magical staff used to perform ‘seithr’, a form of Viking sorcery predominantly practiced by women.She told The Times: ”These are magical practices, which we don’t fully understand. It involves divination, prophecy, communication with the dead and making people do things. Our rod fits, in terms of its form, with a number of these rods that turn up in the 9th and 10th century in female burials. They normally take the form of these long iron rods with knobs attached to them.”The rod would have been ‘ritually’ destroyed in order to prevent the sorceress from rising from the dead, or to stop anyone else from using it. Branning adds, ”When we hear about the Vikings we hear all about the powerful warriors, but now we know there were also powerful women. These women were very well respected, but they were quite feared as well. They may have been on the margins of society. You might not want to get close to them because they have this power. The sources we have describe them as wearing blue and black cloaks with gems attached.”
Source

house-of-thought:

Viking Magic Wand

For decades the experts at the British Museum believed that this item, discovered at a woman’s grave from Norway was just a hook used in fishing. However, new research suggests that it was her ‘magic wand’ and that it was deliberately bent to destroy its power.

The Times newspaper reported that this item, a 90 cm long iron rod, was first brought to the British Museum in 1894. British Museum curator Sue Branning believes that it was probably a magical staff used to perform ‘seithr’, a form of Viking sorcery predominantly practiced by women.

She told The Times: ”These are magical practices, which we don’t fully understand. It involves divination, prophecy, communication with the dead and making people do things. Our rod fits, in terms of its form, with a number of these rods that turn up in the 9th and 10th century in female burials. They normally take the form of these long iron rods with knobs attached to them.”

The rod would have been ‘ritually’ destroyed in order to prevent the sorceress from rising from the dead, or to stop anyone else from using it. Branning adds, ”When we hear about the Vikings we hear all about the powerful warriors, but now we know there were also powerful women. These women were very well respected, but they were quite feared as well. They may have been on the margins of society. You might not want to get close to them because they have this power. The sources we have describe them as wearing blue and black cloaks with gems attached.”

Source

(via owls-love-tea)


125 notes

(Source: wheateyebrows, via eye99)


62 notes

(Source: style.com, via yohjihatesfashion)


Jesus